Kelsey Hightower is working with the Kubernetes team to improve the product through user empathy and dogfooding.

Show notes:

Kelsey Hightower is on Twitter

Want to be on the next episode? You can! All you need is the willingness to talk about something technical.

Theme music is "Crosscutting Concerns" by The Dirty Truckers, check out their music on Amazon or iTunes.

So far, going from Windows 10 to the Windows 10 Anniversary Update has been a relatively smooth transition.

The highlights for me is Bash on Ubuntu on Windows. One of the coolest darn things that Windows has added in a long time. I was able to kick off a Riak server (for instance) without VMWare or VirtualBox! YOW

Two problems I ran into:

  • Some Cisco VPN tool was no longer compatible. I think this is from a previous job, and it's not a concern for me. I can imagine this could be devastating for others.
  • "WMVCore.dll was not found" when I try to run Camtasia Studio or Camtasia Recorder.

That last error I've encountered before: when updating to Windows 8 and when updating to Windows 10. Normally the solution is to install a service pack, as TechSmith notes in their support forums. That didn't work for me.

WMVCore.dll is missing

Another option is to copy over the DLL files from the Windows.old folder. That might have worked, except I jumped the gun and cleaned that folder off my hard drive before I could save the DLLs!

Another option is to download WMVCore.dll from a site like dll-files.com. I'm sure dll-files is legit, but this option makes me uncomfortable, especially in regards to Windows system files. But I was desperate. I tried it, and it didn't work for me (I did get a different error, however!)

Finally, I realized that I have another machine running Windows 10! I found the WMVCORE.DLL file that I needed there (in my case, it was in C:\Windows\SysWOW64). I copied it over and got a new error: I was missing mfperfhelper.dll. So I copied that over, and then WMASF.DLL as well. Then, my beloved Camtasia started running again.

These are tools that I depend on to record and edit in-person sessions that I've presented and screencasts, so I'm glad that I got it to work.

I would offer the DLL files here for you, but you really shouldn't be downloading DLL files, especially from some random blog. If you're really desperate, you can ask me on Twitter.

David Neal is writing cross-platform desktop apps with Electron!

Show notes:

David Neal is on Twitter

Want to be on the next episode? You can! All you need is the willingness to talk about something technical.

Theme music is "Crosscutting Concerns" by The Dirty Truckers, check out their music on Amazon or iTunes.

#Hashtags in blog post titles

August 09, 2016 mgroves 0 Comments
Tags: seo twitter

As a developer advocate, part of my job is starting conversations: on blogs, on twitter, on forums, etc.

Twitter and #hashtags - image licensed through Creative Commons - https://www.jisc.ac.uk/blog/are-you-flying-high-in-social-media-for-uk-further-education-and-skills-05-jan-2016

And for better or for worse, my company's flagship product is measured on db-engines.com by hashtags and twitter activity.

This has had a side-effect of making me twitch a bit when I see a tweet that says "Couchbase" but not "#Couchbase". On one hand: I want Couchbase's ranking to improve. On the other hand: it's none of my darn business what you tweet or how you tweet it. But it occurred to me that maybe some people would put in a hashtag if they thought about it. Maybe they are just forgetting, or copy/pasting, or using an automated "share" button (or app), and calling it good enough. Or maybe they're a link aggregation bot.

This got me thinking that maybe by putting hashtags in blog post titles, it would increase the number of tweets with "#Couchbase" in them.

So instead of "Couchbase for Windows and .NET" I would title my blog post "#Couchbase for Windows and .NET". This isn't a terribly new idea. I experimented with it once, but I'm afraid to continue doing so because:

It might hurt SEO

I have no evidence to support this yet one way or the other (this post discussing it suggests that hashtags might actually help SEO), but Google/Bing might not ignore that '#' symbol in the post. It might help Twitter, but it might hurt search engine ranking. Which could be a net loss (in both db-engines and in general).

It might be obnoxious

I like hashtags. When they are used properly. When #every #single #word #is #hashtagged, I find that extremely annoying. I also find "hashtag as punchline" annoying #UsingAHashTagDoesntMakeItFunnier. A hashtag is something that should be used to help find tweets with similar content and ultimately find more interesting people to tweet with. Is a hashtag in a blog post title obnoxious? Would it increase the likelihood that you would bail on reading the post or watching the video?

It might become obsolete

Blog page and HTML titles probably won't be obsolete in 10 years. Hashtags, on the other hand, might be. Twitter (or Facebook or Google+) goes away or ditches hashtags, and now I have a huge archive full of blog post titles that have hashtags for no reason.

I would definitely like to hear your thoughts and opinions on hashtags in general, and especially hashtags in blog post titles. Tweet at me or leave a comment below.

Some other views on the topic:

 

Correl Roush is using Erlang to develop fault-tolerant, scalable phone systems.

Show notes:

Correl Roush is on Twitter

Want to be on the next episode? You can! All you need is the willingness to talk about something technical.

Theme music is "Crosscutting Concerns" by The Dirty Truckers, check out their music on Amazon or iTunes.

Matthew D. Groves

About the Author

Matthew D. Groves lives in Central Ohio. He works remotely, loves to code, and is a Microsoft MVP.

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