Podcast preview - July 2015

June 29, 2016 mgroves 0 Comments
Tags: podcast

I've been busy recording podcast episodes with some GREAT guests, and I thought I would give you a quick preview of what's to come.

Subscribe now!

Coming soon on the Cross Cutting Concerns podcast in July 2016:

  • Calvin Allen on Chocolatey NuGet
  • Vance Feldman on the ForeverScape artwork and mobile app
  • David Giard on Cognitive Services from Microsoft
  • Matt Bok on home automation tech

And there's even more coming! Subscribe now with your podcatcher of choice.

Want to be on the next episode? You can! All you need is the willingness to talk about something technical.

I'm trying to familiarize myself with node.js, since it seems to be in use by a lot of Couchbase customers. I heard that Visual Studio code had some pretty good node.js support built in, so I decided to give it a shot.

I already had node and npm installed on my Windows machine. I don't remember why. If you aren't sure if you do, open up Powershell (or cmd) and try:

node --version

and

npm --version

(If metaphors help you, I think of node as ASP.NET and I think of npm as NuGet)

If neither of those commands works, then you can install node with Chocolatey NuGetchoco install nodejs

The next easiest thing you can do is create a file with text editor, say "app.js". Put this into that file:

var msg = "Hello, world!";
console.log(msg);

Woo. Now back at the command line, type:

node app.js

And guess what it will write out? If you guessed "Hello, world!" then give yourself 10 points.

So, what good is this? Well, you can now write programs in JavaScript outside of a browser. A lot of people use this to write server-side JavaScript, for example. They might use a framework like Express (which, back to the metaphors, I think of as ASP.NET MVC). You can use npm to install express and an npm "start" command to run your Express app. I may blog more about that later, after I play with it some more.

Dave Glick talks about Wyam and static content generators.

Show notes:

Dave Glick on Twitter

Want to be on the next episode? You can! All you need is the willingness to talk about something technical.

Theme music is "Crosscutting Concerns" by The Dirty Truckers, check out their music on Amazon or iTunes.

Craig Stuntz talks about an Incredibly Strange Programming Language: Idris.

Show notes:

Want to be on the next episode? You can! All you need is the willingness to talk about something technical.

Theme music is "Crosscutting Concerns" by The Dirty Truckers, check out their music on Amazon or iTunes.

In my view, Visual Studio Code doesn't share much with the standard Visual Studio software, except for the name.

This isn't a bad thing, per se. But don't expect all the features you're used to in Visual Studio.

Getting started is super easy. Open up a command lind, and type:

choco install visualstudiocode

Then navigate to some source code folder (still in command line) and type:

code .

(You may have to restart your command line environment, since chocolatey updates the path environment variable)

I used this on a PHP project. When I opened a php file, Visual Studio Code recognized it a such, and complained that it couldn't find the php executable.

If you are also using PHP, you'll need to go to File->Preferences->Workspace Settings. This will open up a JSON file that you can make changes to. It will probably be just an empty JSON object to start with.

You then have two options:

  1. Add "php.validate.enable": false
  2. Add "php.validate.executablePath": "path\to\php.exe"

I opted for #1, since I was just doing some quick hacking on a really simple PHP project.

Easy, peasy. Visual Studio Code doesn't take up much hard drive space; it's quick to install and use. So give it a try today.

Matthew D. Groves

About the Author

Matthew D. Groves lives in Central Ohio. He works remotely, loves to code, and is a Microsoft MVP.

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