Posts tagged with 'personal'

Jyotsna Raghuraman talks about her unconventional entry into software, and overcoming her fears.

Note that this was recording at the Indy.Code() conference in a hallway, so the audio may be a bit noisier than usual. At one point there was a loud buzzer from a freight elevator.

Show Notes:

  • Check out Jyotsna's blog posts on SEP
  • You can contact her at the email address given out in the show's audio

Jyotsna Raghuraman is on Twitter.

Want to be on the next episode? You can! All you need is the willingness to talk about something technical.

Theme music is "Crosscutting Concerns" by The Dirty Truckers, check out their music on Amazon or iTunes.

Jesse Riley is thinking about giving it all up and becoming a farmer.

Show Notes:

Jesse Riley is on Twitter

Want to be on the next episode? You can! All you need is the willingness to talk about something technical.

Theme music is "Crosscutting Concerns" by The Dirty Truckers, check out their music on Amazon or iTunes.

David Giard (back again!) and your humble narrator talk about what the developer community is and why it's so great.

Show notes:

  • I don't really have any specific links for this podcast.
  • But I recommend that you go to meetup.com or your search engine of choice.
  • Find yourself at least one local developer group that discusses a topic that interests you.
  • Go to at least one meeting.
  • Tell me (and David) how it went.

David Giard on Twitter

Want to be on the next episode? You can! All you need is the willingness to talk about something technical.

Theme music is "Crosscutting Concerns" by The Dirty Truckers, check out their music on Amazon or iTunes.

There are only two hard things in Computer Science: cache invalidation and naming things. -Phil Karlton

It seems that naming has been an issue that has plagued my entire career. Confusing names. Names that sound similar but mean very different things. I'm even guilty of causing it!

But if you take one thing away from this blog post: Couchbase is not CouchDB. They are both database products, with some common roots, but they are not the same thing.

Interested in learning more? Check out:

While I'm at it, let me clear up a few other naming confusions that have plagued me for a long time:

College

  • I used single letter variables. For no good reason. It didn't occur to me that I could use an entire word!
  • For my undergrad. I went to Ohio University. No, not the Buckeyes of Columbus. The Bobcats of Athens.
  • Oh, but I also went to The Ohio State University for my master's. Those are the Buckeyes of Columbus.

Working at OSU

  • I worked full time at OSU. I started out in Student Affairs Business Office, which used to be called something else (HFSEC or something?)
  • I moved to Student Affairs IT.
  • Student Affairs was renamed to Student Life.
  • I have no idea what it's called now. I still call it Student Life.

Family names

  • My wife and I named our firstborn "Matthew Kevin Groves".
  • He's not Matthew Groves Jr, because my middle name isn't Kevin.
  • The convention within my family is that I am "Matt" and he is "Matthew".
  • "Groves", "Grover", "Tall Guy" also work. If you call me "Tall Guy", be prepared to be called "Shorty" or "Shrimp".
  • I will NOT tolerate any use of "Matty".
  • I'm not "Grooves" or "Graves" or "Grove".
  • I live in Grove City, Ohio. I realize this doesn't help.
  • I used to live in an apartment complex called "The Groves", which is in Grove City.
  • I may be related to Leslie Groves. This has nothing to do with naming, it's just a cool bit of trivia I thought I would mention.

Quick Solutions

  • I worked at Quick Solutions in Columbus for a bit.
  • Quick Solutions was named after a guy with a last name of Quick. Neat, huh?
  • It's not called Quick Solutions anymore; It's Fusion Alliance now.

Telligent

  • I worked for Telligent for a few years. It's a company based in Dallas which makes the excellent Telligent Community product.
  • They changed their name to Zimbra while I was working there (after an acquisition).
  • After I left, they changed their name back to Telligent (after some sort of spin-off). The people I knew and worked with are with Telligent.
  • Telligent and Telerik are different companies; I've never worked for Telerik.
  • Jim Holmes worked for both Telligent and Telerik. Thanks for that, Jim.

Couchbase

  • Not CouchDB.
  • Couchbase.
  • If it helps, think of "SQL Server" and "MySQL". They both have "SQL" in the name, but they aren't the same thing.
  • Couch is an acronym (Cluster Of Unreliable Commodity Hardware).

Well, that's it. I started this post just to help and clear up the "CouchDB" and "Couchbase" thing, but it turned into more of a personal rant. Anyway. Couchbase.

 

Joining Couchbase

April 22, 2016 mgroves 0 Comments
Tags: personal career

Short version: My new job title is Developer Advocate, and I am working for Couchbase.

Long version: Being a developer advocate / developer evangelist is something that I've been considering for a long time. I've enjoyed speaking, blogging, writing, screencasting, teaching, helping, networking for a while now. But until now, I had always done these things only in my spare time. The thought of making those activities into my full time job appealed to me. But, there are a lot of developer advocate positions out there, and most of them don't appeal to me, because the product or the company doesn't appeal to me. The few times I managed to get interviews with really awesome companies with great products, it didn't work out, and I thought that maybe it wasn't meant to be.

But I'm very excited to announce that I finally found a DA opening with a great company with a cool product (a NoSQL database company based in Silicon Valley!).

I've done a lot of thinking this year about my career, and what direction I want to go. I've been a coder for my entire career. Some of the best parts of being a coder is sharing knowledge with other coders: teaching, writing, and expanding my own knowledge in the process. As much as I enjoyed working for my previous employer, they make a product that isn't developer-facing, and therefore a developer advocate position just wasn't going to happen for me there.

I'm ready to begin a new chapter, and I'm looking forward to reaching out to developers and helping to build the Couchbase community.

Matthew D. Groves

About the Author

Matthew D. Groves lives in Central Ohio. He works remotely, loves to code, and is a Microsoft MVP.

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